2012 2011 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999

2012

  • Carter CL, Resnick EM, Mallampalli M, Kalbarczyk A. Sex and GenderDifferences in Alzheimer’s Disease: Recommendations for Future Research. J Womens Health. 2012 Oct;21(10):1-6.
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  • Resnick EM, Mallampalli M, Carter CL. Current Challenges in Female Veterans’ Health. J Womens Health. 2012 Sept;21(9)895-900.
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  • Coakley M, Fadiran EO, Parrish LJ, Griffith RA, Weiss E, Carter C.Dialogues on Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies forEngaging Women and Minorities in Clinical Trials. J Womens Health. 2012July 2;21(7):713-716.
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2011

  • Miller VM. Sex differences in cardiovascular disease. Sexuality, Reprod & Menopause. 2011 Aug;9(3):21-28.
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2008

  • Greenberger P. Flaunting the feminine side of research studies. Science. 2008 Nov 28;322(5906):1325-6.
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2007

  • Parekh A, Sanhai W, Marts SA, Uhl K. Advancing women’s health viaFDA critical path initiative. Drug Discov Today. 2007;4(2):69-73.
    2007, report in Drug Discovery Today following Society for Women’s Health Research/FDA Office of Women’s Health workshop on the FDA Critical Path Initiative.
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  • Resnick EM, Simon VR, Iskikian SO, Marts SA; Society for Women’sHealth Research. Future research in sex differences in obesity andcardiovascular disease: report by the Society for Women’s HealthResearch. J Investig Med. 2007 Mar;55(2):75-85.
    2007, report in Journal of Investigative Medicine on Society for Women’s Health Research workshop.
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2006

  • Belani CP, Marts S, Schiller J, Socinski MA. Women and lung cancer:epidemiology, tumor biology, and emerging trends in clinical research.Lung Cancer. 2007 Jan;55(1):15-23. Epub 2006 Nov 3.
    2006, report in the journal Lung Cancer from Society for Women’s Health Research roundtable on women and lung cancer.
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2005

  • Simon V. Wanted: women in clinical trials. Science. 2005 Jun 10;308(5728):1517.
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  • Becker JB, Arnold AP, Berkley KJ, Blaustein JD, Eckel LA, Hampson E, Herman JP, Marts S, Sadee W, Steiner M, Taylor J, Young E. Strategiesand methods for research on sex differences in brain and behavior.Endocrinology. 2005 Apr;146(4):1650-73. Epub 2004 Dec 23.
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2004

  • Simon V, Resnick E. Drug Therapy and Gender. US Pharmacist. 2004;29(9):37-38.
  • Schwartz A. Sex-Based Biology and Drug Therapy. US Pharmacist. 2004 Oct 6;29(9):10-11.
  • Keitt SK, Fagan TF, Marts SA. Understanding sex differences inenvironmental health: a thought leaders’ roundtable. Environ HealthPerspect. 2004 Apr;112(5):604–609.
    2004, report from Society forWomen’s Health Research/National Institute of Environmental HealthSciences roundtable in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.
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2003

  • Lin VY, Resnick EM, Shupnik MA. Truncated estrogen receptorproduct-1 stimulates estrogen receptor alpha transcriptional activity by titration of repressor proteins. J Biol Chem. 2003 Oct3;278(40):38125-31. Epub 2003 Jul 23.
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  • Keitt SK, Wagner CR, Tong C, Marts SA. Understanding the biology of sexand gender differences: using subgroup analysis and statistical designto detect sex differences in clinical trials. MedGenMed. 2003 Jun9;5(2):39.
    This article encourages the application of sex analysis early in the clinical research process.
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  • Keitt SK. Sex & gender: the politics, policy, and practice ofmedical research. Yale J Health Policy Law Ethics. 2003Summer;3(2):253-78.
    This article explores issues surrounding women’s participation in clinical trials.
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  • Keitt SK, Wagner C, Tong C, Marts SA. Positioning women’s healthcurricula in US medical schools. MedGenMed. 2003 May 28;5(2):40.
    This survey revealed that a large number of U.S. Medical schools lack an established women’s health curriculum.
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  • McGovern V. Sex matters: exploring differences in responses to exposures. Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jan;111(1):A24–A25.
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2002

  • Fannon SA, Marts SA. Sex, hormones and the cardiovascular system. Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Oct;13(8):320-1.
    This meeting report examines the molecular mechanisms underlying hormonal effects on the cardiovascular system.
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  • Fannon SA, Vidaver RM, Marts SA. Early encounters, lifetime effects: hormones in the intrauterine environment. Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Aug;13(6):230-1.
    This article contains information on how the prenatal hormonal environment affects morphology, physiology, and behavior.
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  • Marts SA. Interdisciplinary research is key to understanding sexdifferences: report from the Society for Women’s Health Research Meeting on understanding the biology of sex differences. J Womens Health GendBased Med. 2002 Jul-Aug;11(6):501-509.
    This article emphasizes theimportance of a bench-to-bedside approach in healthcare as well as aninterdisciplinary approach to research.
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  • Vidaver RM. Sex and the brain: not just a one-track mind. Trends Evid Based Neuropsychiatry. 2002 Jul-Aug.
    This feature article looks at the sex differences in brain development and behavior.
  • Fannon SA, Vidaver RM, Marts SA. Sex, cells and signals in the developing brain. Trends Neurosci. 2002 Jul;25(7):334-5.
    This article reports on how hormones shape neural architecture and mediate signaling pathways in the brain.
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  • Barinaga M. Cells exchanged during pregnancy live on. Science. 2002 Jun 21;296(5576):2169-2172.
    This news article from Science Magazine addresses microchimerism—the phenomenon of fetal cells existing in a mother’s body for years after pregnancy and visa versa.
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  • Fannon SA, Vidaver RM, Marts SA. Sex, genes and hormones. Trends Cogn Sci. 2002 Jun 1;6(6):230-231.
    This journal article discusses how prenatal genetic and hormonal influences affect intelligence and behavior.
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  • Greenberger P. Women’s health research: women’s health funding for 2003. J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2002 Jun;11(5):477-8.
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  • Vidaver RM. Molecular and clinical evidence of the role of estrogen in lupus. Trends Immunol. 2002 May;23(5):229-30.
    This scientific journal article examines the underlying molecular mechanisms that affect the role of hormones on lupus.
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  • Greenberger P. University of Wisconsin fosters interdisciplinaryresearch on sex differences. J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2002May;11(4):339-40.
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  • Greenberger P. Advances in sex-based analysis. J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2002 Apr;11(3):199-200.
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  • Greenberger PE. News from the Society for Women’s Health Research.Survey findings indicate a need for further education on sex-specificmedical facts. J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2002 Mar;11(2):101-2.
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  • Greenberger PE, Knab S. News from the Society for Women’s HealthResearch: subgroup analysis in clinical trials: detecting sexdifferences. J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2002 Jan-Feb;11(1):7-9.
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2001

  • Hollon T. What women want: taking sex differences seriously in clinical trials. Clinical Researcher. 2001 Aug;11(8):24-27.
    This article covers why and how to effectively include and analyze sex differences in clinical trials.
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2000

  • Sex, genes and women’s health. Nat Genet. 2000 May;25(1):1-2.
    This editorial explores the effect of hormones on gene expression. Based on the SAGE I conference.
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  • Baron-Hall D, Vidaver RM. Symposium report: the first annual conferenceon sex and gene expression. J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2000;9(9).
    This article reports on topics discussed at the first annual conference onSex and Gene Expression including sex chromosomes, genomic imprintingand autoimmune disease.
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  • Schachter B. Creative alternatives to diploid gene expression. Trends Genet. 2000 Jul;16(7):290-291.
    This article discusses the strategies used by mammals such as genomicimprinting and X-inactivation to selectively silence allelic pairs.
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  • Vidaver RM, Lafleur B, Tong C, Bradshaw R, Marts SA. Women subjects inNIH-funded clinical research literature: lack of progress in bothrepresentation and analysis by sex. J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2000 Jun;9(5):495-504.
    This report examines the inclusion of women in NIH clinical research.
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1999

  • Thompson PM, Wolf JL. The sexual revolution in science: whatgender-based research is telling you. J Investig Med. 1999 Mar;47(3).
    This fascinating review of gender-based research findings explores weightcontrol, digestive diseases, cancer, musculoskeletal health,cardiovascular disease, neurobiology, mental health, and immunology.

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