Sleep

SWHR Interdisciplinary Network on Sleep aims to stimulate sex- and gender-based research that elucidates the role of sleep and circadian rhythms on health and wellbeing across the lifespan. Click here to learn more.
Amita SehgalAmita Sehgal
John Herr Musser Professor of Neuroscience
Investigator, HHMI
Director, Program in Chronobiology
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania


Why did you to join the Sleep Network?
Because I think it is important to address gender differences in sleep as these could be very relevant for many other disorders.

What do you hope the Network accomplishes over its five-year run?
I hope we are able to increase visibility of this issue–gender differences in sleep and the implications these could have for physiology in general– among health care providers, researchers and the public.  I would also like to see the network support specific research projects that could directly assess gender-specific effects of sleep on physiology.

How is the Sleep Network unique? What, in your opinion, sets it apart?
It is unique because while it is important in and of itself, it also impinges on other networks.  Sleep and circadian rhythms affect most other physiological processes– metabolism, cardiovascular physiology, immune function– so the consequences of disrupted sleep are relevant for many disorders.

Urology

SWHR Interdisciplinary Network on Urologic Health in Women aims to raise awareness of the impact of bladder health on women’s well-being across the lifespan. Click here to learn more.
Elizabeth R. Mueller MD, MSME
John Herr Musser Professor of Neuroscience
Investigator, HHMI
Director, Program in Chronobiology
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania


Why did you to join the Sleep Network?
I have always been impressed by the REAL work that the SWHR does in moving forward issues that are of importance to women. When I was asked to join the team and saw that I would be working with a well-recognized, diverse team of scientist, clinicians and researchers, it was too good to pass up.

What do you hope the Network accomplishes over its five-year run?
We want to raise the level of awareness  (public and health professionals) that bladder health affects our general health and should no longer be considered just “a quality of life issue”. We want to work to build a relationship with our school nurse colleagues to raise the awareness of bladder health in children.

How is the Sleep Network unique? What, in your opinion, sets it apart?
The Urology Network is unique in that we are looking at strategies to promote bladder health in women across the lifespan. While we will not be conducting studies within the network, we are looking at the gaps in our current basic science and clinical understanding of bladder health. For example, what is the correct micro biome for a healthy bladder and what basic science strategies can help us understand a healthy bladder?