Women have unique health needs, and most diseases and conditions affect women differently than men.

The Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) is the thought leader in promoting research on biological sex differences in disease and improving women’s health through science, policy, and education. We are making women’s health mainstream.

Women’s Health Equity Initiative

Women in the United States experience health disparities throughout their lifespans as a result of their gender, historic health inequities in the health care system, and socioeconomic conditions. 

The new Women’s Health Equity Initiative highlights statistics on women’s health in the United States and aims to engage communities on solutions to improve health equity across multiple disease states, conditions, and life stages. The first phase of the Initiative is focused on Alzheimer’s disease, bone health, maternal health, and menopause. 

Through the creation of a unique roadmap and video testimonials, featuring caregivers, patients, and clinicians across the United States, SWHR is working to end women’s health disparities based on age, race, ethnicity, geography, and among caregivers. To learn more and support the Women’s Health Equity Initiative, visit www.swhr.org/healthequity.

UPCOMING SWHR EVENTS

Join us for expert conversations on women’s health research and care, hosted by SWHR and featuring SWHR leaders.

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Upcoming Events › SWHR Event

December 2022

Closing the Loop for Lupus: A Wellness Toolkit for Women

Hosted by SWHR

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by widespread inflammation that often results in damage to the joints, skin, brain, lungs, kidneys and blood vessels. An estimated 1.5 million Americans have some form of lupus, and 90% are women between the ages of 15 and 44. Lupus is more prevalent among women of color, who also develop symptoms at younger ages and have more severe symptoms and complications from the disease.Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common type of…

December 5 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm EST

Addressing Concerns and Considerations Surrounding the Inclusion of Pregnant and Lactating Populations in Research

Hosted by SWHR

Pregnant and lactating women have historically been excluded from clinical trials. Federal policies from the 1970s that excluded “women of childbearing age” from research led research to use male participants, limiting our knowledge base. Although a 1994 report from the Institute of Medicine recommended that pregnant women be presumed to be eligible to participate in clinical studies and that lactating women not be excluded from clinical studies, concerns remain about including pregnant and lactating populations in research. During this virtual…

December 6 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm EST

April 2023

SWHR 2023 Annual Awards Gala

Hosted by SWHR

SWHR’s 2023 Annual Awards Gala will be held on Wednesday, April 26, 2023 to honor leaders who have significantly advanced women’s health throughout their careers. The event will be held at the InterContinental Washington DC – The Wharf, with the cocktail reception beginning at 6:00 p.m, followed by the dinner and program at 7:00 p.m. Business attire. We look forward to seeing you there. MORE EVENT INFORMATION To purchase a sponsorship or tickets, click here.

April 26, 2023 @ 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm EDT
InterContinental D.C. – The Wharf, 801 Wharf Street SW
Washington, DC 20024
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WHAT WE’RE DOING

Utilization Management Policies and Autoimmune Diseases Fact Sheet

This resource explores autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases care options and related policy affects on provider and patient experiences.

Menopause Preparedness Toolkit: A Woman’s Empowerment Guide

Understanding the many changes related to menopause and being prepared for their effects can help women embrace wellness during the journey. This toolkit helps prepare individuals for life through and following the menopause transition.

Promoting Bone Health Through Policy: A Call to Action

SWHR’s first disease-specific policy agenda is intended to serve as a roadmap outlining key areas of policy needed to improve the bone health of women from childhood through adulthood.

Noninvasive Prenatal Screening Resource Guide for Women

Screening for genetic conditions can be done using a number of different methods and at different time points in a person’s life. Learn more about the role of Noninvasive Prenatal Screening (NIPS) in this personal toolkit. 

SHARE YOUR STORY

SWHR is asking women to share their personal health journeys, to be posted on the SWHR website and other SWHR-branded material, as appropriate. In addition to patient stories, SWHR is interested in the stories of those who serve as caregiver for a family member (parent, spouse, child, etc.). Your story is powerful and we hope to share with policymakers, researchers, providers and most importantly, other women.

Your story could help educate and inform other women who may be going through a similar experience.

LEARN HOW TO SHARE YOUR STORY

who we are

Learn more about SWHR’s science, policy and education efforts to make women’s health mainstream.

Learn more about SWHR’s mission, vision, and  strategic map.

Learn more about our science programs.



Work that
matters

Biological differences between the sexes exist, from a single cell to the entire body. SWHR is bringing attention to sex and gender differences in health and disease in order to address unmet needs and research gaps in women’s health.

WHAT IS WOMEN’S HEALTH RESEARCH?


  we’re leading the way

Together with our partners from diverse sectors, we bring attention to areas of need in women’s health.

ABOUT SWHR
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30
YEARS

PRIORITIZING WOMEN’S HEALTH

Since 1990, SWHR has been championing for research and policy that improves women’s health.

+50%
WOMEN

IN FDA DRUG TRIALS 

After years of SWHR advocacy, in 2017, for the first time, women accounted for over half of research participants for approved drugs.

11
SCIENCE NETWORKS

IDENTIFYING GAPS IN RESEARCH

SWHR convenes researchers, clinicians, patients and other stakeholders to effect change in overlooked areas of women’s health