Study shows only 31% of women feel comfortable talking about menopause at work



January 11, 2024 – The Society for Women’s Health Research released results from its EMPACT Menopause Study.  

The Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) today released findings and insights from the Employee Perspectives and Challenges Concerning the Transition of Menopause (EMPACT Menopause) Study, which aims to better understand the workplace experiences of individuals who have entered or completed the menopause transition, as well as their coworkers and employers. 

With 75% women between the ages of 25 and 54 making up over participating in the labor workforce  in the United States according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, it is critical to discuss women’s health experiences, including the menopause transition, in the context of workplace engagement. 

Highlights from the EMPACT Menopause Study include: 

  • 38% of respondents experienced presenteeism due to the impacts of menopause symptoms on their work life. 
  • 2 out of 5 women considered finding or found a new job due to their menopause symptoms or experience. 
  • Only 31% of women reported feeling comfortable talking about their menopause symptoms or experiences at work.
  • 1 out of 6 supervisors indicated being uncomfortable setting up accommodations to address their employees’ menopause symptoms at work.

DOWNLOAD THE EMPACT MENOPAUSE STUDY BULLETIN

This bulletin is based on findings from the Understanding the Impact of Menopause on the Workplace Survey conducted by SWHR in 2023. The survey sought to better understand and improve workplace experiences for the significant portion of the workforce who have entered or completed the menopause transition, as well as collect valuable insights about impacts on coworkers of those experiencing menopause, ultimately guiding us to a better workplace for everyone. 

The EMPACT Menopause Study builds on SWHR’s ongoing work in the menopause space, encompassing webinar conversations held about promoting menopause wellness at work, creating menopause-friendly legislation, and tips for advocacy in the workplace during your menopause transition; and expanding on SWHR’s Menopause Preparedness Toolkit launched in 2022. Stay tuned this spring, when SWHR will release menopause at work resources, created for both individuals experiencing menopause and their employers and human resources teams.  

 

For questions about the study, please contact SWHR’s Chief Science Officer, Dr. Irene Aninye, at EMPACT[at]swhr.org with inquiries. 

To set up an interview with a member of the SWHR team and learn more about these results, please contact communications[at]swhr.org with inquiries. 

 

About SWHR 

The Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) is a national nonprofit and thought leader dedicated to promoting research on biological sex differences in disease and improving women’s health through science, policy, and education. Founded in 1990 by a group of physicians, medical researchers, and health advocates, SWHR is making women’s health mainstream by addressing unmet needs and research gaps in women’s health. Thanks to SWHR’s efforts, women are now routinely included in most major medical research studies and more scientists are considering sex as a biological variable in their research. Visit www.swhr.org for more information. 

January 11, 2024 – The Society for Women’s Health Research released results from its EMPACT Menopause Study.  

The Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) today released findings and insights from the Employee Perspectives and Challenges Concerning the Transition of Menopause (EMPACT Menopause) Study, which aims to better understand the workplace experiences of individuals who have entered or completed the menopause transition, as well as their coworkers and employers. 

With 75% women between the ages of 25 and 54 making up over participating in the labor workforce  in the United States according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, it is critical to discuss women’s health experiences, including the menopause transition, in the context of workplace engagement. 

Highlights from the EMPACT Menopause Study include: 

  • 38% of respondents experienced presenteeism due to the impacts of menopause symptoms on their work life. 
  • 2 out of 5 women considered finding or found a new job due to their menopause symptoms or experience. 
  • Only 31% of women reported feeling comfortable talking about their menopause symptoms or experiences at work.
  • 1 out of 6 supervisors indicated being uncomfortable setting up accommodations to address their employees’ menopause symptoms at work.

DOWNLOAD THE EMPACT MENOPAUSE STUDY BULLETIN

This bulletin is based on findings from the Understanding the Impact of Menopause on the Workplace Survey conducted by SWHR in 2023. The survey sought to better understand and improve workplace experiences for the significant portion of the workforce who have entered or completed the menopause transition, as well as collect valuable insights about impacts on coworkers of those experiencing menopause, ultimately guiding us to a better workplace for everyone. 

The EMPACT Menopause Study builds on SWHR’s ongoing work in the menopause space, encompassing webinar conversations held about promoting menopause wellness at work, creating menopause-friendly legislation, and tips for advocacy in the workplace during your menopause transition; and expanding on SWHR’s Menopause Preparedness Toolkit launched in 2022. Stay tuned this spring, when SWHR will release menopause at work resources, created for both individuals experiencing menopause and their employers and human resources teams.  

 

For questions about the study, please contact SWHR’s Chief Science Officer, Dr. Irene Aninye, at EMPACT[at]swhr.org with inquiries. 

To set up an interview with a member of the SWHR team and learn more about these results, please contact communications[at]swhr.org with inquiries. 

 

About SWHR 

The Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) is a national nonprofit and thought leader dedicated to promoting research on biological sex differences in disease and improving women’s health through science, policy, and education. Founded in 1990 by a group of physicians, medical researchers, and health advocates, SWHR is making women’s health mainstream by addressing unmet needs and research gaps in women’s health. Thanks to SWHR’s efforts, women are now routinely included in most major medical research studies and more scientists are considering sex as a biological variable in their research. Visit www.swhr.org for more information.