Promoting Bone Health Through Policy: A Call to Action

As the United States population ages, the burden of fractures across the country is expected to rise. However, through the implementation of key policy measures spanning prevention, research, detection, and treatment, the U.S. health care system could see tremendous benefits that lower health care costs and improve patient outcomes.

In the Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR)’s commitment to raising awareness about women’s bone health and osteoporosis and driving policy change to improve women’s bone health outcomes across the lifespan, SWHR published Promoting Bone Health Through Policy: A Call to Action. This call to action is intended to serve as a roadmap outlining key areas of policy needed to improve the bone health of women from childhood through adulthood.

DOWNLOAD THE PROMOTING BONE HEALTH THROUGH POLICY CALL TO ACTION

 

As the United States population ages, the burden of fractures across the country is expected to rise. However, through the implementation of key policy measures spanning prevention, research, detection, and treatment, the U.S. health care system could see tremendous benefits that lower health care costs and improve patient outcomes.

In the Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR)’s commitment to raising awareness about women’s bone health and osteoporosis and driving policy change to improve women’s bone health outcomes across the lifespan, SWHR published Promoting Bone Health Through Policy: A Call to Action. This call to action is intended to serve as a roadmap outlining key areas of policy needed to improve the bone health of women from childhood through adulthood.

DOWNLOAD THE PROMOTING BONE HEALTH THROUGH POLICY CALL TO ACTION

 

Hear More about Bone Health Policy

Watch This Congressional Briefing

Steps to Strengthen America’s Seniors: How Preventing Osteoporosis Helps America’s Health System

 

Sponsor

The Bone Health Program is supported by educational sponsorships from Amgen and UCB. SWHR maintains editorial control and independence over educational content.

 

This material was created by the Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) and is intended to serve as a public educational and informative resource. This material may be cited or shared on external channels, websites, and blogs, with attribution given to SWHR, or printed and displayed in its original formatted version. SWHR encourages the sharing and reposting of its content in order to spread awareness around women’s health issues. For specific questions about sharing SWHR content, please reach out to communications@swhr.org