Understanding the Impact of Sex and Gender in Osteoarthritis: Assessing Research Gaps and Unmet Needs

The Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) published a review in The Journal of Women’s Health assessing research gaps and unmet needs around sex and genders differences in osteoarthritis (OA). The paper summarizes discussions among experts during an SWHR interdisciplinary scientific roundtable in January 2020 and highlights areas of need that warrant further attention in OA research, diagnosis, care, and education.

OA is the leading cause of work disability among adults in the U.S. and affects more than 300 million people globally, but that burden is not distributed equally. Women experience a higher overall prevalence of disease as well as greater severity of symptoms and increased levels of disability.

Despite the prevalence of OA, there are foundational gaps in research and understanding of the disease’s development and progression. SWHR’s review states that the influence of sex and gender differences must be considered in OA research and clinical care to better understand the gender disparities in this disease and to improve health outcomes for all.

Read the Review

The Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) published a review in The Journal of Women’s Health assessing research gaps and unmet needs around sex and genders differences in osteoarthritis (OA). The paper summarizes discussions among experts during an SWHR interdisciplinary scientific roundtable in January 2020 and highlights areas of need that warrant further attention in OA research, diagnosis, care, and education.

OA is the leading cause of work disability among adults in the U.S. and affects more than 300 million people globally, but that burden is not distributed equally. Women experience a higher overall prevalence of disease as well as greater severity of symptoms and increased levels of disability.

Despite the prevalence of OA, there are foundational gaps in research and understanding of the disease’s development and progression. SWHR’s review states that the influence of sex and gender differences must be considered in OA research and clinical care to better understand the gender disparities in this disease and to improve health outcomes for all.

Read the Review