Loading Events

Stronger than Sticks and Stones: Promoting Women’s Bone Health through Preventive Care

October 3 @ 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm EDT

Approximately 54 million Americans have low bone mass, placing them at increased risk for osteoporosis and bone fracture. Risk of bone fracture is higher in women compared to men, in part, due to the influence of the hormone estrogen. Throughout a woman’s life, estrogen has important bone building function that is compromised when its production significantly reduces after menopause. Approximately half of all women over age 50 will break a bone because of osteoporosis, and in older adults, complications related to a broken bone can be life threatening and result in the need for long-term nursing care. The screening recommendation for bone mineral density at age 65 and older for women makes it challenging to identify bone disease early enough to maximize preventive care. Shifting from a reactive break-and-fix model to one that centers around predictive and preventive bone health and wellness could substantially decrease the clinical and public health burden of bone fractures and diseases.

SWHR is hosting a virtual public forum to discuss women’s bone health, the experiences of women living with osteoporosis, and how to navigate access and management of care.

REGISTER

 

This public forum is a follow-up to SWHR’s Bone Health Roundtable held in April 2022 that sought to identify gaps in research, clinical practice, policy, and education.

 

Follow the conversation on Twitter at @SWHR and #SWHRtalksBoneHealth.

This event is free and open to the public.

Details

Date:
October 3
Time:
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm EDT
Event Categories:
,
Website:
https://swhr-org.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_1nh02tayS_-vUqMlEbd1pg

Organizer

SWHR

Goals

  • Provide an overview of how bone health and disease impact women and men differently
  • Increase visibility of the patient experience, emphasizing ways to empower women to optimize their bone health and general wellbeing
  • Discuss policy solutions that can improve access to preventive care and treatments for women living with osteoporosis

Panelists

Keith J. Loud, MD, MSc, MMgmt
Chair of Pediatrics and Physician-in-Chief, Geisel School of Medicine and Children's Hospital at Dartmouth
Keith J. Loud, MD, MSc, MMgmt
Chair of Pediatrics and Physician-in-Chief, Geisel School of Medicine and Children's Hospital at Dartmouth

Keith J. Loud, MDCM, MSc, MMgmt, FAAP, is Chair of the Department of Pediatrics at The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Physician-in-Chief of the Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock (CHaD). A 1996 graduate of the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University, Dr. Loud completed his pediatric residency at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in 2000 and fellowship training at Boston Children’s Hospital in 2004, also earning a Master of Medical Sciences in clinical investigation at Harvard Medical School. Most recently, Keith earned an International Masters in Health Leadership (MMgmt) from the Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill in 2021. Certified in adolescent medicine, sports medicine, and general pediatrics by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP), Dr. Loud is associate professor of pediatrics and of orthopaedic surgery at Geisel and a former member of the ABP Subboard of Adolescent Medicine, American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on Sports Medicine & Fitness Executive Committee, and American Hospital Association Maternal and Child Health Governing Council. He currently serves as Vice Chair of the Board of Trustees for the New Hampshire Children’s Health Foundation. 

Deborah Mitsuko Kado, MD, MS
Professor of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine and GRECC Veterans Administration Health System
Deborah Mitsuko Kado, MD, MS
Professor of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine and GRECC Veterans Administration Health System

Dr. Deborah Kado is Professor and Chief of Geriatric Research in the Division of Population Health and Primary Care at Stanford University. She also serves as the Director of the Advanced Fellowship Training in Geriatrics program for the GRECC at the VA Palo Alto and as co-director of Stanford’s Center on Longevity.  She graduated with honors from Bryn Mawr College and obtained her medical degree from Cornell University Medical College. She completed her internal medicine and chief residency at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. From there, she was at UCSF for her post-doctoral research training in clinical research, followed by a Master’s Degree of Science in Epidemiology at the UCLA School of Public Health, and a clinical fellowship in geriatrics at UCLA. Her primary research focus has been on osteoporosis and the related disorder hyperkyphosis. Over more recent years, her academic interests have broadened to include almost all things aging. She has enjoyed continuous funding from the NIH since she started on the UCLA faculty in 2000 and in 2007 defined hyperkyphosis as a new geriatric syndrome. 

Katherine Sharp, PhD, MPH
Associate Clinical Professor, University of Maryland, School of Public Health, Department of Behavioral & Community Health
Katherine Sharp, PhD, MPH
Associate Clinical Professor, University of Maryland, School of Public Health, Department of Behavioral & Community Health

Dr. Sharp is an Associate Clinical Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health in the School of Public Health (SPH). In addition to her Director of Graduate Studies role, she hold numerous other leadership positions in the SPH and serves on the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee of American Bone Health, a national non-profit organization promoting bone health. Dr. Sharp has 15 years of high-level, administrative experience in an accredited School of Public Health, 20 years of public health teaching experience, 12 years of health communication experience, eight of which were working for government consulting firms on health communication/social marketing projects and campaigns funded by the NIH, CDC, SAMSHA and NSF. Her research expertise is in health literacy, health behavior theory, social marketing, market research, planning, implementing and evaluating health communication campaigns/interventions, survey design, and focus group moderation. Additionally, she enjoys public speaking and planning and facilitation of workshop and orientation. Dr. Sharp earned her B.S. from UMCP in Community Health Education, her Masters in Public Health (MPH) in Behavioral Sciences and Health Education from Emory University and her PhD in Health Promotion from Kent State University. 

 

Sponsors

SWHR’s Bone Health Program is supported by educational sponsorships from Amgen and UCB. SWHR maintains editorial control and independence over educational content.