Assessing and Treating Migraine in Women and Men

Migraine affects women differently than men both physiologically and socially. These biological differences, as well as sociocultural norms, are key variables in the etiology, diagnosis, and management of migraine.

It is important to apply what we know about sex and gender differences in migraine to both scientific research and clinical practice, including disease detection, treatment, care, and education. As such, this commentary from SWHR in Practical Pain Management provides a review of what is known about sex and gender differences in migraine and its relevance to clinical care.

To learn more, check out the work of SWHR’s Migraine Network.

Migraine affects women differently than men both physiologically and socially. These biological differences, as well as sociocultural norms, are key variables in the etiology, diagnosis, and management of migraine.

It is important to apply what we know about sex and gender differences in migraine to both scientific research and clinical practice, including disease detection, treatment, care, and education. As such, this commentary from SWHR in Practical Pain Management provides a review of what is known about sex and gender differences in migraine and its relevance to clinical care.

To learn more, check out the work of SWHR’s Migraine Network.

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