Crucial Vaccination Conversations: A Roadmap to Engage Women and Their Communities

Improved immunization rates can assist in reducing disparities in health care and disease across all age groups.  

Vaccines are an important measure to promote family and public health by slowing, and sometimes preventing, the spread of infectious and dangerous diseases. Through sound research efforts, immunizations have been developed for implementation throughout the life-course. 

SWHR’s roadmap is designed to guide community program planners as they engage women and their families in meaningful conversations and initiatives to improve individual and public health through vaccinations. 

Inspired by insights from an Immunization Education Working Group of public health researchers and professionals, community leaders, patient advocates, and health care providers convened by SWHR, the roadmap is a guidance document that can be utilized when developing immunization education outreach programs. This document is intended to be useful to any individual or group working in the vaccination campaign space. While this roadmap was created with special consideration for reaching women, the questions, templates, and guidance provided can be adapted for a diversity of target populations and objectives. 

DOWNLOAD THE VACCINE ROADMAP

Improved immunization rates can assist in reducing disparities in health care and disease across all age groups.  

Vaccines are an important measure to promote family and public health by slowing, and sometimes preventing, the spread of infectious and dangerous diseases. Through sound research efforts, immunizations have been developed for implementation throughout the life-course. 

SWHR’s roadmap is designed to guide community program planners as they engage women and their families in meaningful conversations and initiatives to improve individual and public health through vaccinations. 

Inspired by insights from an Immunization Education Working Group of public health researchers and professionals, community leaders, patient advocates, and health care providers convened by SWHR, the roadmap is a guidance document that can be utilized when developing immunization education outreach programs. This document is intended to be useful to any individual or group working in the vaccination campaign space. While this roadmap was created with special consideration for reaching women, the questions, templates, and guidance provided can be adapted for a diversity of target populations and objectives. 

DOWNLOAD THE VACCINE ROADMAP

More from SWHR about Vaccines

Blog Post
SWHR’s Vaccine Roadmap Guides Communities in Vaccination Conversations
By Monica Lefton, SWHR Communications Manager. Women are often key sources of health information and advice for their social networks and make an estimated 80% of all household decisions about the health and health care of their families. This puts women caregivers in a unique position to ensure their family members receive appropriate vaccines as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and their health... Read more »
COVID-19 Vaccination if You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Updated January 18, 2022.  The Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) has joined the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) and other pregnancy experts in recommending that pregnant and lactating people be vaccinated against COVID-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend vaccination for all people aged 5 years and older, including people who... Read more »
Publications
Maternal Immunization: Quick Guide
Vaccines are designed to train your body to recognize and fight infections. Certain vaccines are safe and recommended for women before, during, and after pregnancy to help keep them and their babies healthy, but some vaccines, especially live vaccines, aren’t recommended during pregnancy. To help pregnant people navigate maternal vaccination recommendations before pregnancy, through the... Read more »

SWHR thanks Merck & Co. for their support of this educational work.

This material was created by the Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) and is intended to serve as a public educational and informative resource. This material may be cited or shared on external channels, websites, and blogs, with attribution given to SWHR, or printed and displayed in its original formatted version. SWHR encourages the sharing and reposting of its content in order to spread awareness around women’s health issues. For specific questions about sharing SWHR content, please reach out to communications@swhr.org